Gynecology

Heavy Menstrual Bleeding Treatment in Dalton, GA

What is Considered a Heavy Period?

If a patient experiences any of the following problems, it is recommended that they speak to their doctor:

  • Bleeding that last longer than 7 days
  • Soaking through more than one tampon or pad every hour several hours in a row
  • Needing to change a pad or tampon during the night
  • Experiencing large blood clots

Women should seek immediate medical care if they have soaked through their normal tampon or pad in an hour for more than 2 hours, or feel lightheaded. 

When Heavy Periods Signal a Problem

A number of things can cause heavy periods, but it can signal a health concern and lead to more serious problems. 

A Uterine Growth

Heavy periods can be caused by a growth in the uterus, either a fibroid, which is a noncancerous tumor that develops in the uterine wall, or a polyp, which is a growth made up of endometrium tissue. 

Pelvic Conditions

Heavy menstrual bleeding is one a common symptom of a variety of pelvic conditions, including:

  • Adenomyosis- a condition where the inner lining of the uterus breaks through the muscle wall of the uterus. 
  • Endometriosis- a condition in which the endometrium grows outside of the uterus on the ovaries, fallopian tubes, or the intestines.
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome- a hormonal disorder that can cause the ovaries to become enlarged and develop small collections of fluid
  • Pelvic inflammatory disease- an infection of the reproductive organs that can be a complication of some STDs. 

Irregular ovulation, an ectopic pregnancy, and endometrial cancer can also result in heavy periods. 

Diagnosing the Cause of Heavy Menstrual Bleeding 

The gynecologist will begin to diagnose the cause of heavy periods by looking for signs of a condition, infection, or abnormal growth. They may also do a pelvic exam, pap test, ultrasound, hysteroscopy, or endometrial biopsy. 

Schedule an Appointment

If you are suffering from heavy menstrual bleeding, schedule an appointment at North Georgia Women's Center to meet with one of our board-certified gynecologists. To schedule an appointment by calling (706) 226-3373.

Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

What is Heavy Menstrual Bleeding?

1 in 5 women suffer from heavy menstrual bleeding. Many women begin to experience heavy and/or irregular bleeding in their 30s and 40s, as they begin to get closer to menopause. Heavy periods are more than just a hassle - they take a physical, social, and emotional toll as well.

Studies show heavy menstrual bleeding can affect women in a number of ways:

Physical

  • Many feel tired and nauseated
  • Many experience bad cramps
  • Many have headaches

Social

  • More than 60% have had to miss social or athletic events1
  • About 80% report avoiding sex1
  • 33% have been forced to miss work2

Emotional

  • 77% have depression or moodiness1
  • 75% feel anxious2
  • 57% report a lack of confidence during their period1

Heavy periods are not something with which you have to live. Today, there are a number of effective treatment options available.

 


References

  1. National Women’s Health Resource Center. Survey of women who experience heavy menstrual bleeding. Data on file; 2005.
  2. Cooper J, et al. A randomized, multicenter trial of safety and efficacy of the NovaSure system in the treatment of menorrhagia. J Am Assoc Gynecol Laparosc. 2002; 9:418-428.

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Coronavirus Advisory

North Georgia Women’s Center is closely following the most up-to-date announcements and information on the known cases of Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). Because this information is always changing, we will be monitoring all updates from the World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control.

If you are experiencing cold or flu symptoms, please make sure to contact us via phone prior to your appointment. You may also contact us for any additional questions by calling our office at (706) 226-3373.

Here are a few additional resources as well:

World Health Organization
Centers for Disease Control